In Career Discussions

The term emotional intelligence (EI) was made popular by Daniel Goleman’s 1995 book, Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. Twenty-five years later, it is playing a really important role in careers and the hiring process.

What Is Emotional Intelligence?

According to Psychology Today, “Emotional intelligence refers to the ability to identify and manage one’s own emotions, as well as the emotions of others. Emotional intelligence is generally said to include at least three skills: emotional awareness, or the ability to identify and name one’s own emotions; the ability to harness those emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problem solving; and the ability to manage emotions, which includes both regulating one’s own emotions when necessary and helping others to do the same.” Read more. 

Emotional Intelligence In Your Career

People with higher emotional intelligence are generally better at resolving conflict, teaching others, and managing teams.

A recent article in Entrepreneur.com by Ryan Jenkins, (Speaker, Author, Co-Founder of SyncLX.com) states:

“People who feel cared for are more loyal, engaged, and productive. In fact, employees who feel cared for by their organization are…

  • 10 times more likely to recommend their company as a great place to work.
  • 9 times more likely to stay at their company for three or more years.
  • 7 times more likely to feel included at work.
  • 4 times less likely to suffer from stress and burnout.
  • 2 times as likely to be engaged at work.”

So, it is easy to see why hiring mangers and employers are looking for candidates who have recognizable EI.

How do You Convey Emotional Intelligence in an Interview?

An article by Fast Company titled 7 ways that to demonstrate emotional intelligence in a job interview suggested the following ways.

  1. ACTIVELY LISTEN
  2. SHOW EMOTIONS
  3. SHARE THE CREDIT FOR YOUR ACHIEVEMENTS
  4. SHARE HOW YOU ARE TRYING TO IMPROVE YOURSELF
  5. DON’T SHY AWAY FROM TALKING ABOUT CONFLICT
  6. SHOW THAT YOU CAN LEARN FROM YOUR MISTAKES
  7. ASK QUESTIONS ABOUT CULTURE AND VALUES

Click here to read the full article.

If you would like help on how to include examples of these skills on your resume and in a cover letter, our professional resume writers can help. Companies are looking for quality candidates that have specific skills and experience, as well as soft skills and who can make emotional connections with others.

Check out our FREE resume critique today!

Happy Career Hunting! We are here for you!

Need more job search advice?

Join Our DiscussionDoes your linkedin profile need a makeover

For more insights and a community of like-minded professionals join our LinkedIn group Resume Help and Advice for Professionals and Executives

Recent Posts

Leave a Comment

Start typing and press Enter to search

trending skills. Bar graph with cartoon man holding the last bar above his head.Why did you quit your job? Drawing of a hand holding question marks and another hand holding lightbulbs